TEEN TRYING TO TURN INTO VAMPIRE DIES AFTER BEING BITTEN BY RABIES-INFECTED BAT

By | January 22, 2018

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San Diego, CA | A California teen has died from an infection from rabies after he was bitten by a wild bat he was trying to domesticate.
Stanford Guterson, 17, died from medical complications at San Diego’s Scripps Mercy Hospital this week after showing advanced symptoms of rabies.

The young teenager who was fascinated with the idea of becoming a vampire possibly got bitten or scratched by the animal in a “satanic ritual” according to family members and friends.

Guterson was allegedly the victim of bullying at school and believed he could reenact revenge upon his enemies through the process of acquiring supernatural powers by “turning into a vampire” said one of his close friends.

“He was really into the dark occult shit and hoped that if he got bit by or had sex with a bat it might help him become a vampire,” his best friend Malcolm Jackson told reporters.
According to his friend Jackson, he also frequently drank blood from his 56-year-old unemployed girlfriend who did not respond to media requests for an interview and was not available for comments.

Guterson's mother, Marje, says her son developed a fascination for vampires after he was diagnosed with an allergy to garlic as a young child.

Guterson’s mother, Marjory, says her son developed a fascination for vampires after he was diagnosed with an allergy to garlic as a young child.

An obsession with vampires
If Guterson’s entourage knew of his obsession with vampirism, they never expected it to lead to his untimely death, according to family members and friends.

“He must’ve watched the Buffy the Vampire Slayer series a thousand times and loved to dress like her,” admitted his mother in tears.

“I had to give away an antique silver cutlery set given to me by my grandmother, he just would not touch it, he said it burned his skin,” she recalls.

He also practiced satanic sexual rituals which involved “drinking human blood” and “swallowing his own semen” according to another close friend who desired to remain anonymous.
In the Americas, bat bites are the most common source of rabies infections in humans, and less than 5% of cases are from dogs.

Exposure to rabies results in paralysis, delirium, convulsions and, without medical attention, death in about six days usually caused by respiratory paralysis.